Igitur non dormiamus sicut ceteri.

The War Party and Its Legacy

Mr. Nicholas Sanchez has an intriguing article here on the legacy that George W. Bush will leave behind for the Republican Party. I try to avoid political discussions in the blogsphere, but this is certainly one area that I believe conservatives ought to consider. Perhaps Sanchez is being a bit pessimistic when he states, “This political dearth Republicans face can largely be traced to Bush’s philosophical metamorphosis from a traditional, non-interventionist conservative to the neoconservatives’ exemplar of a ‘War President, and his positioning of the Republicans as the ‘War Party’,” but perhaps he is not far off target in describing the disillusion that many conservatives feel in seeing their party usurped by neo-conservatives.

One thing is certain, Americans still tire of war quite easily and it should be something worth remembering. The legacy of the War on Terror and the architects who designed is yet to be decided and there are certainly more reflective historians who can gaze at this problem.

May God remember us in this coming election!

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One response

  1. Problems with neo-conservatism and “interventionist” policies aside, a political and philosophical approach to the “War on Terror” should at least make an effort to understand the ways in which this inadequately-named engagement is completely different–in scope as well as kind–from previous wars of the 20th century. The question ought to be asked: how does a non-interventionist (paleo)conservative confront both globalization and “radical Islam”? I think the Republican “base” is less concerned with the prosecution of the war (or its legacy), and more with the way in which the war turns the eye from sound domestic policies.
    I’m also sort of concerned with the excessive emphasis in Mr. Sanchez’s article on gaining and keeping congressional seats and the opinion of “GOP wise men.” To my mind that was what brought about the failure of the recent Republican Congress.

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    30 September, 2007 at 7:38 pm